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Saturday, October 30, 2010

2010 METROBANK ART AND DESIGN EXCELLENCE (MADE) WINNERS

2010 Metrobank Art and Design Excellence (MADE)
Metrobank Foundation Honors Fresh Artistic Talent

The Metrobank Foundation has discovered a new batch of young and promising Filipino artists and designers as it names the 2010 winners of the Metrobank Art and Design Excellence (MADE) Competition.
“The Metrobank Foundation is proud to announce the winners of this year’s MADE Competition,” said its president Aniceto “Chito” M. Sobrepeña. “Our honorees are truly deserving of this recognition because of their exemplary artistic skills. We hope that this award will help them as they create a name for themselves in their respective fields.”

A total of ten artists and designers emerged as winners in the painting, sculpture, architecture and interior design competitions of MADE.

Reynaldo Samson, Jr., a banking and finance graduate from the Polytechnic University of the Philippines and a native of Antipolo, Rizal, emerged as the grand prize winner in the oil / acrylic on canvas category of the painting competition for his piece “Ang Hindi Matapus-tapos na Ebolusyon, at ang Walang Katapusang Paghahanap sa ‘Di Matagpu-tagpuang Langit” which touches on issues related to religion and faith. Visual effects artist Mary Grace Tenorio of Quezon City won the second prize for her work entitled “Tanikalang Bakal” which symbolizes the analogy of power and control, master and slave relationship, and the presence of hierarchy in the society. Rolf Domini Campos, a fine arts major at the Far Eastern University, depicted his personal struggle to finish his studies in his piece “Unfinished Bout” which bagged the third prize under the same category.

A first timer in joining the MADE competition and a self-taught artist, Lester Rodriguez of Binangonan, Rizal was declared grand prize winner in the water media on paper category of the painting competition for his masterpiece entitled “The Hidden Agenda” which addresses the issues on peace talks in the country. Inspired by a television advertisement of one of the presidentiables during the recently concluded national elections, “Patungo” by Kathleen Yeo, a fine arts major at the College of Holy Spirit, Manila, was awarded the special prize under the same category.

For the sculpture competition, Philippine High School for the Arts teacher Marc Vincent Cosico was named as the grand prize winner. His piece “Superhero Complex” is a reflection of his take on the commercialization of the Filipino tradition of penitensya. Dennis Ticao, a student of Carlos Hilado Memorial State College and a native of Talisay City, Negros Occidental, was declared the special prize winner. His entry entitled “Riders of the Storm” depicts the struggle of Filipino families against poverty which he has experienced firsthand.

Architect Miguel Angelo Mañosa, who finished his bachelor’s degree in architecture at the University of Santo Tomas and his master’s degree in design science at the University of Sydney, bested his peers and emerged as the grand prize winner in the architecture competition. The design of his entry “Fandiño Residence” is characteristic of contemporary Philippine green architecture that maximizes passive cooling, natural light and the use of active façade systems, and utilizes recycled wood and indigenous materials.

Freelance interior designer Maureen Grace de Jesus of Muntinlupa City bagged the grand prize in the interior design competition. With a modern tropical design concept, her entry entitled “Rise of the Fallen” highlights the use of reclaimed wood which also serves as the focal point of the design. Interior Designer Heidrun Milan of Tacloban City, who also teaches at the Eastern Visayas State University, was named special prize winner for his design called “Eco-lectic Reflection” which makes use of refurbished and recycled materials as furniture and accent pieces.

All winners will be honored in ceremonies to be held on September 17 at the Le Pavillon in Pasay City. Aside from a glass trophy by sculptor Noell EL Farol, the awardees will likewise receive cash prizes. The grand prize winners will receive P200,000 each, while the special prize winners will have P150,000 each. The second prize and third prize winners for the oil / acrylic on canvas category of the painting competition will get P170,000 and P150,000, respectively. The winning works, as well as the semi-finalists, will be exhibited on September 18 to 20 also at the Le Pavillon. A number of the semi-finalists in the painting and sculpture competitions will be for sale.

Now on its 26th year, MADE is an annual competition which aims to recognize budding artists in the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture and interior design, as well as to launch and enhance their careers. The pioneering art competition of the Metrobank Foundation which started in 1984, MADE lists the names of now established up-and-coming masters such as Bobby Feleo, Elmer Borlongan, Mark Justiniani, Duddley Diaz, Dan Raralio, Noell El Farol, Alfredo Esquillo, Jr., and Gabby Barredo, and promising architects and designers such as Architects Noel Tan, Michael Peña, Jericho Adriano, and John David O’Yek and Interior Designers Marybeth Tabaquin, Jasmine O’yek Sy, Wilhelmina Garcia, April Frigillana and Karina Diana Cortez in its roster of winners.

MADE advocates shapes you.” This annual competition is presented in partnership with Federal Land, Inc., United Architects of the Philippines, Philippine Institute of Interior Designers, Chamber of Furniture Industries of the Philippines, BluPrint and LifestyleAsia.

The Metrobank Foundation, the corporate social responsibility arm of the Metrobank Group, was established by its chairman Dr. George S.K. Ty in 1979. With the theme “Excel. Engage. Empower.” the Foundation has promoted a culture of excellence among Filipinos through its various programs, such as the Search for Outstanding Teachers, the Metrobank Art and Design Excellence, The Outstanding Philippine Soldier, Country's Outstanding Policemen in Service, the Metrobank Math Challenge, and College Scholarship Program and the Metrobank Foundation through the arts, a creative and sustainable environment for holistic human development, thus its tagline “Your environment Professorial Chair Lectures in partnership with the Supreme Court and the Philippine Judicial Academy. The Foundation also engages its partners and awardees in different activities geared towards giving back to the society. Through these initiatives, the Metrobank Foundation empowers its awardees and partners to become better citizens of the community.


UE BUKLOD SINING ART TALKS WITH PAINTERS BALATBAT AND RUIZ


UE Buklod Sining held art talks with internationally acclaimed painters Max Balatbat and Ronaldo Ruiz
By UE Buklod Alumni Society

The University of the East Buklod Sining, one of the oldest art organization in the UE College of Fine Arts, held two art workshops last September 8 and October 2, 2010 as part of the organization’s 21st anniversary celebration in conjunction with Buklod Alumni Society and Sininggang Art Group, and took place in each studio of both world class painters.

Read more


Friday, October 29, 2010

TEN LESSONS THE ARTS TEACH




-The arts teach children to make good judgments about qualitative relationships. Unlike much of the curriculum in which correct answers and rules prevail, in the arts, it is judgment rather than rules that prevail.

-The arts teach children that problems can have more than one solution and that questions can have more than one answer.

-The arts celebrate multiple perspectives. One of their large lessons is that there are many ways to see and interpret the world.

-The arts teach children that in complex forms of problem-solving purposes are seldom fixed, but change with circumstance and opportunity. Learning in the arts requires the ability and willingness to surrender to the unanticipated possibilities of the work as it unfolds.

-The arts make vivid the fact that words do not, in their literal form or number, exhaust what we can know. The limits of our language do not define the limits of our cognition.

-The arts teach students that small differences can have large effects. The arts traffic in subtleties.

-The arts teach students to think through and within a material. All art forms employ some means through which images become real.

-The arts help children learn to say what cannot be said. When children are invited to disclose what a work of art helps them feel, they must reach into their poetic capacities to find the words that will do the job.

-The arts enable us to have experience we can have from no other source and through such experience to discover the range and variety of what we are capable of feeling.

-The arts' position in the school curriculum symbolizes to the young what adults believe is important.


Elliott Eisner, in Beyond Creating: The Place for Art in America's Schools. Getty Center for Education in the Arts. 1985 p. 69.
http://www.toknowart.com/apsarts/eisner.html

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

AUGUST




August by Maya Munoz
October 27, 2010, Wednesday
6-9pm

Maya Muñoz describes August as a portrait of Agnes, a character from Milan Kunderas’ book entitled Immortality. Interestingly enough, Muñoz rarely does portraits, but when she does, it is usually of one person. And this time, for this show, Agnes is that one.

Muñoz’s Agnes is based on a character who so captivated the author, Kunderas, with a simple gesture. In the book, Agnes is at a swimming pool, and as she is leaving, she turns to the lifeguard and makes a gesture with her hands… something she has probably done all her life. This launches Kunderas’ story about the unexplained and random components that make up a person’s essence.

Similarly, Muñoz tries to capture Agnes. She explains: “I've read that book a long time ago but the image of Agnes has also always been with me.” With one large painting and small drawings, she captures what it is that people will remember about a person long after her youth has expired, and even long after her death. It is not so much about her face, but about the nuances – “her silhouette, her jaw line, her favorite hairdo”.

To Muñoz, August is a “cut out with few general details that define the person for us”. Named after the month she began working is a show that preserves the essence that remains.

August by Maya Muñoz runs simultaneously with Blind Field: Photography and Place curated by Wawi Navarroza in Silverlens and Wet Paint by Elaine Roberto-Navas, curated by Roberto Chabet in SLab until Novermber 20, 2010.

With special thanks to The Drawing Room. For inquiries, contact Silverlens Gallery at 2/F YMC Bldg. II, 2320 Pasong Tamo Ext., Makati, 816-0044, 0917-5874011, or manage@silverlensphoto.com. Gallery hours are Monday to Friday 10am–7pm and Saturdays 1–6pm. www.silverlensphoto.com / slab.silverlensphoto.com.

Words: Bea Davila; Image: Maya Munoz, August (detail), 2010

MY TREES

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

WET PAINT




Wet Paint by Elaine Roberto-Navas
Curated by Roberto Chabet
October 27, 2010, Wednesday
6-9pm

SLab is proud to announce Wet Paint by Elaine Roberto-Navas, curated by Roberto Chabet.

Roberto-Navas, a Singapore-based Filipino artist, debuts in SLab with a painting show all about water, inspired by photographs of the River Thames taken by artist Roni Thorn. Thorn "depicted the different moods and portraits of the river"; and Wet Paint is Roberto-Navas' own version.

In Wet Paint, Roberto-Navas recreates water's many moods and faces with her characteristic use of impasto, the technique of laying on paint thickly. The thick crusts of greens, blues and the faint wisps of white allow the water's ever-changing character to surface. But the changes are subtle.

On a series of rectangular canvases, she paints one section of the river. Each documents the shifts in the current, every new swell, each new foam tip, and the constant shift of light. The water fills the entire canvas. No background and no added details. It’s as if Roberto-Navas had a camera herself; she chose a particular spot, zoomed in, and took a series of photos of that one spot. Looking at her work is like looking at a magnified filmstrip. But it too has its classical references.

To her, her work is “a modern equivalent of what Monet was trying to do – painting the same scene and observing minute by minute changes.” Reminiscent of Impressionist painting, Roberto-Navas’ “landscape” stands out. Though rich in color and movement, her works also evoke silence and calm. There is a sense of depth and history from within. A collector of Philippine contemporary art describes:

“One other thing about water - they are present and always changing but also ancient and permanent. The face of water is different each second but it is the same water the River Thames that the French, Romans, Vikings, and primitive man saw. Eternal but ephemeral. One of the great paradoxes of nature.” (M. Samson)

Wet Paint is dynamic. Not knowing where the water begins nor ends, where it swells or pulls back, where it has come from or where it is headed raises curiosity and ultimately, awe.

Wet Paint runs simultaneously with Blind Field: Photography and Place curated by Wawi Navarroza in Silverlens and August by Maya Muñoz in 20SQUARE until November 20, 2010.

For inquiries, contact Silverlens Gallery at 2/F YMC Bldg. II, 2320 Pasong Tamo Ext., Makati, 816-0044, 0917-5874011, or manage@silverlensphoto.com. Gallery hours are Monday to Friday 10am–7pm and Saturdays 1–6pm. www.silverlensphoto.com / slab.silverlensphoto.com.

Words: Bea Davila; Image: Elaine Roberto-Navas, Law of Causality, 2010

Monday, October 25, 2010

BLIND FIELD: PHOTOGRAPHY AND PLACE




BLIND FIELD: Photography and Place, Curated by Wawi Navarroza
with Yason Banal, Ringo Bunoan, Bea Camacho, Jed Escueta, Thomas Kellner, Jet Melencio, Renan Ortiz, Beatrix Pang + Peter Piller + Sushan Chan, Rachel Rillo, Gerardo Tan, Maria Taniguchi, MM Yu
October 27, 2010, Wednesday
6-9pm

"Blind Field", as lifted from Roland Barthes' seminal text on photography, Camera Lucida, refers to a kind of ‘double vision’ that happens in cinematic space, the screen, the space for suspension of disbelief, set in a static place wherein you are taken into another world, not always phantasmagorical but something closer to the limbic, something closer to memory, yet not quite. In this context, the curator has extended the location of Blind Fields into translucent “soft places” generated by photographs.

Blind Field: Photography and Place, Wawi Navarroza’s curatorial debut, is a nonchalant safari field trip into a garden of explored territories and constructions.

The exhibition brings together the works of 14 contemporary artists working with photography (locally and abroad) who engage in ideas of "Place" around or beyond the traditional use of the medium. Rather than being about “moments captured once and for all (Helder)”, the works draw attention to: (1) where it was taken; (2) where it is placed; and (3) where it will take you.

The works go further than the physical place - the location, topography and architecture - and explores what imminent theorist Michel Foucault calls Heterotopias (sites neither here nor there although they may be rooted to actual places).

The group show moves away from the passive appreciation of hung photographs into a more direct engagement with the viewer who is physically compelled to move about and encounter the work as ‘sites’. The gallery space, a blind field (‘something already there’ but not seen), is activated as a cultivated habitation: the location where new situations out of these encounters take place.

Blind Field, ultimately, is an invitation into a reconnaissance of contemporary photography. It unabashedly presents the democracy of today’s photographs and its abstractions: photographs as documentations, records, index; as vernacular images or snapshots; as site-specific interventions; as flat objects or sculptural components to spatial installations/assemblage, photographs as projections/video; photographs dictated by process, performance; or photographs as immaterial images in meta-spaces.

Disrobed off the glamour of the fine art print and observed from a clinical gaze, the works shine as clear commentaries to Photography’s ultimate paradox: that of freezing fixed evidences, at the same time, being pliable and mutable to placements and meaning; absent and present at the same time; here and also somewhere somehow.

BLIND FIELD: Photography and Place runs simultaneously with Wet Paint by Elaine Roberto-Navas, curated by Roberto Chabet in SLab and August by Maya Muñoz in 20SQUARE.

For inquiries, contact Silverlens Gallery at 2/F YMC Bldg. II, 2320 Pasong Tamo Ext., Makati, 816-0044, 0917-5874011, or manage@silverlensphoto.com. Gallery hours are Monday to Friday 10am–7pm and Saturdays 1–6pm. www.silverlensphoto.com / slab.silverlensphoto.com.

Words: Wawi Navarroza; Image: Yason Banal, Wrong Place, 2010

Sunday, October 24, 2010

WHAT IS ART AND THE PURPOSE OF MAKING ART?



READ ARTICLE


ON THE SURFACE




On the Surface: an exhibition of photographs by Ninfa F. Bito
Opening Cocktails on Tuesday, 26th October 2010 6:30 – 8:30 pm
Show will run from 26 October - 12 November 2010

GREYSTONE
G/F, Prince Plaza II
Legazpi Street, Greenbelt Park
Makati City 1229
Philippines
Gallery Hours: Mon-Sat, 11am - 7pm
Telephone No. 543.2498

BALLET PHILIPPINES' ART AUCTION




Ballet Philippines Art Auction is an online and live auction of works by artists who have responded to my appeal to express their collective selflessness of art in support of other forms of art. The proceeds of the art pieces that will be auctioned will go to the Ballet Philippines’ scholarship program that will nurture young talents. The sustained education needed by dance scholars is an expensive one. It requires 10 hours daily education, provision for dance shoes, housing for some and transportation for the needy. Please join us in bringing the expression of art where it should be at the forefront of our nation’s best stages and the world’s.

Bid online at www.balletphilippines.org/artauction or come to Arts in the City @ The Fort on Oct 26-28. Live auction is on October 28 from 6pm.

Saturday, October 23, 2010

CONTEMPORARY ART PHILIPPINES: ISSUE 12: September / October 2010

ARTISTA NG BAYAN





Artista ng Bayan

Due to typhoon Juan, the Concerned Artists of the Philippines is postponing the opening of Artista ng Bayan at the Sining Kamalig today. We do not want to take risks on the safety of people. The new date of opening will be on Sunday, OCTOBER 24, 7pm.


Across history, artists and cultural workers have always moved to strengthen and reinforce resistance to oppression. Through a blood-filled and still ongoing history of suppression and colonization, their rendering of social issues in paints and images, deconstruction of social realities in music and multimedia, and criticism of tyranny in poetry and literature have inspired – indeed, fueled – resistance, movement, and revolution.

This year, the Concerned Artists of the Philippines (CAP) will pay tribute to 12 artista ng bayan, namely -- Amado V. Hernandez, Carlos Bulosan, Lorena Barros, Mulong Sandoval, Eman Lacaba, Adul De Leon, Monico Atienza, Leo Rimando, Papo De Asis, Ishmael Bernal, Alex Remollino and Racquel Aumentado.

Rendered by a mix of established and upcoming contemporary Pinoy visual artists, and artista ng bayan in their own right - Jef Carnay, Mark Justiniani, England Hidalgo, Renan Ortiz, Brenda Fajardo, Carla Cubero, Nikki Luna, Mervin Malonzo, Don Salubayba, Benjamin Torrado Cabrera, Beth Parocha-Doctolero, Stum Casia, and ARMAS, the exhibit is to remind us of the life and works of artists who have constantly used art as a weapon to resist oppressive culture, to promote a nationalist and people-oriented art, and to become a crucial part of the people's struggle for freedom, in the hope that we may be inspired do the same.

Concerned Artists of the Philippines (Organizer)
Email: concerned_artists_phil@yahoo.com
Mobile: 0908-8841170

ARTWORKS FIRST FIFTY YEARS 1948 – 1998




Artists' Association of the Philippines Foundation, Inc. in cooperation with Ayala Museum cordially request the pleasure of your company to the book launching of ARTWORKS FIRST FIFTY YEARS 1948 – 1998 Art Association of the Philippines Tuesday, October 26, 2010, 6:00 pm Ayala Museum, Makati Avenue corner dela Rosa Street, Makati City.

Dress code: Smart Casual
Books will be sold at Ayala Museum and Filipinas Heritage Library
Rsvp: Mhalou +632-7815918 / 7496439

IN THE EYE OF MODERNITY

Thursday, October 21, 2010

UNTITLED STROKES ARTWORKS



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ASUL NA KARITON!




TAYO NANG MANGARAP AT MAGBAHAGINAN SA ASUL NA KARITON!
ni Fredyl Hernandez

Anong kulay ang paborito mo? Ano ang pangarap mo? Kung bibigyan mo ng kulay ang iyong pangarap, anong kulay kaya ang ibibigay mo?

Ang asul ay malawak na kulay. Ito ay kulay na magaan. Ito ang kulay ng kalangitan at ng karagatan. Ito rin ang kulay ng kariton ng magkapatid na batang nangangariton sa kuwentong ”Ang Asul na Kariton.” Bagaman mahirap ang buhay ng magkapatid, puno pa rin ito ng kulay at saya, puno ng ningning at hiwaga. Ipinakita nilang tunay na makulay at malikhain ang imahinasyon ng mga batang Pilipino.

Ipinakita rin ng dalawang bidang bata sa kuwento ang mabuting pakikitungo sa ibang tao at sa kanilang kariton na itinuturing nilang kaibigan. Ang kariton ang kanilang tahanan, ang kanilang katuwang sa paghahanapbuhay, kasama sa kanilang pakikipagsapalaran, at proteksiyon sa kanilang pagtulog sa gabi.

Ang Oktubre ay Buwan ng mga Bata. Lahat ng bata ay kasama sa pagdiriwang na ito — may-kaya man o mahirap, mataba man o payat, maputi man o maitim, nag-aaral man o nasa lansangan.

Maaari kayang magsama sa isang worksyap ang dalawang batang galing sa magkaibang katayuan sa buhay? Maaari kaya silang magdrowing, sumulat, kumanta, at umakting nang sabay? Puwede kaya silang magkuwentuhan at sabay na mangarap, katulad ng pangangarap ng dalawang batang may asul na kariton?

Ang aklat-pambatang ”Ang Asul na Kariton” ay isinulat ni Genaro Gojo Cruz at binigyang-buhay ni Alma B. Quinto sa kaniyang mga larawang nilikha mula sa mga piraso ng tela. Inilimbag ito ng LG&M ng Vibal Publishing House, Inc. at sinuportahan naman ang eksibit at worksyap ng Museo Pambata. Ang proyektong Tayo Nang Mangarap at Magbahaginan sa Asul na Kariton! ay magkakasamang binuo ng mga indibiduwal at institusiyong naniniwala at nagsusulong sa karapatan, galing, talino at magagawa ng batang Pilipino.

Ang kuwento ay isinalarawan upang higit nating maintindihan. Pinagtagpi-tagpi ang mga retaso para maipakita ang mga eksena ng kuwento. Tinahi ang mga imahen upang mapagdugtong-dugtong at mabuo ang mga tagpo. Sa worksyap, ilalarawan din ng mga batang kalahok ang kanilang mga kuwento at pangarap. Nawa’y manatili sa isipan ng mga batang kalahok ang makukulay na larawan ng kanilang mga pangarap upang makamit ang mga ito sa hinaharap.

Tayo nang mangarap! Tayo nang magkuwentuhan at magbahaginan!

UNTITLED STROKES EXHIBITION OPENING PHOTOGRAPHS



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