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Wednesday, September 30, 2009

AFTERMATH


RISING FROM THE ASHES: Dennis Montera’s Aftermath
by Reuben Ramas Cañete, Ph.D.

Catharsis has always been the lodestone by which Dennis “Sio” Montera produces his distinctive form of Filipino Abstraction. The Cebu City-based MFA graduate of UP Diliman, and faculty member of UP College Cebu, utilizes an opposition between acrylic-based media and brilliantly-coloured paints with black bitumen tar, a medium more known for paving roads and sealing gutters than for painting canvas panels. And yet, such an unlikely approach to material is not entirely against the Modernist grain: the black paintings of Ad Reinhardt and Frank Stella in the 1950s also used tar in order to exploit their intense tonality of black, as well as the reflective, sometimes opalescent sheen that the oils of the tar excrete from reflecting light. The material integrity of oil and acrylic (provided that the first lies on top of the second) is also proven from those paintings by Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning dating back to the 1940s—but all of this, of course, should not be an issue to those who see in Montera’s paintings as not an ambivalent conflict between water-based and oil-based media, but rather in the vision of elemental—and thus metaphorical—conflict resolved into significant form. As far back as 2004, when Montera finished his first
magnum opus, Penitensiya, both the use of media as well as the concept of an epic conflict to be resolved was already transmitted through his meditation of penitential labour as a peculiarly Filipino aesthetic form of psychic as well as social redemption.

In his 2009 series Aftermath, Montera utilizes the near-catastrophes and lucky breaks that he has experienced in his personal life over the past year as the aesthetic source of his catharsis: his wife’s difficult ectopic pregnancy, as well as his mother’s bout with kidney cancer, that tested both his emotional and financial strength, and eventually managed to resolve these crises successfully. The return of normal life in the Montera household was the chance for Sio to meditate on the fragility of existence, and realize that “life held no guarantees.” Liberated from a sense of deliberation, Sio eviscerate his painting style into a freer and more spontaneous fragmentation of motif. Gone were the long loops, spatially-delimited blocks, and carefully-laid diagonal drips that characterized his 2006-2008 paintings, and in turn the “open forms” of randomly intersecting circular splashes and thrown drips, the freer colour brushwork, and the emphasis on entropy rather than structure became dominant elements in his new work. The results also imply a more energetic restlessness and unwillingness to compromise on his artistic convictions.

This transition can be seen in The Beginnings of Panic, where the previous tendency to “block out” colour and black elements begins to fray, as the compositional blocks float amidst flying debris of painted texture and black, like asteroids smashing against each other in the colourful void of a nebula. Newfound Rapture is the resolution of such a “crisis,” where the compositional placements of underlying aquamarine, magenta, and white acrylic painted blocks are reworked repeatedly to form a dense base, looking rather like fantastic cave wall formations, upon which the black tar is then flung as a foreground element, becoming like trace patterns of bats flying in neon-inflected space. In The Vicissitudes of the Seasons, Sio summarizes his past year’s life as one of order interspersed with chaos, and resolved with order: the base colour blocks that march in horizontal regularity are layered with a vertical frenzy of gestural texture, and then is finished with an uneven grid of black lines. Aftermath may be the account of one artist whose life went briefly to hell and back, but Dennis “Sio” Montera also provides us with the comfort that every catastrophe is also an opportunity to learn and grow. Indeed, Sio’s “aftermath” also proves his aesthetic capacity to resolve crisis with a cathartic renewal, a phoenix of work that rises from the ashes of despair.


COUCH ZONE CHAT : FOCUS BEYOND FRAME

BEYOND FRAME : PHILIPPINE PHOTOMEDIA

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

SUNGDU-AN 5


Sungdu-An 5 @ Museum of the Filipino People

The National Commission for Culture and the Arts – National Committee on Visual Arts through the Arts Studies Foundation, Inc. in cooperation with the National Art Gallery, National Museum of the Philippines will launch SUNGDU-AN 5 with the theme CURRENT: DALOY NG DUNONG on September 30, 2009, Wednesday, 6.00PM at the National Museum (4th flr. Museum of the Filipino People).

Participating artists include: Karl Aguila, Errol Balcos, Rey Bollozos, Kiri Lluch Dalena, Oscar Floirendo, Gutierrez Mangansakan II, Errol “Budoy” Marabiles, Keiye Miranda, Hannah Pettyjohn, Rommel Pidazo, Goldie Poblador, Produksyon Tramontina, Inc., Mark Salvatus, Christine Sicangco, Michelline Syjuco, Talaandig Artists, CJ Tañedo, Rodel Tapaya, Margaret Kathryn Tecson, Brian Uhing and Noe Valenzuela. There will also be a Panel Discussion with the Exhibit Curators, Artists and Project Director which starts at 4.00 PM. Exhibition will run until November 15, 2009.

For inquiries, contact 09179633490 or e-mail sungdu_an5@yahoo.com

Monday, September 28, 2009

PROJECTSPACE


PROJECTSPACE

Exploring the property of space and to regard it as a part of one’s self, and to show that it is one’s very own domain and reflection, is what every artist aims. In PROJECTSPACE, a recent exhibition of works by Carlos ‘Totong’ Francisco II, Allan Alcantara, Aaron Bautista and Isidro ‘Jon’ Santos, these exhibiting artists has captured that space and transformed the ephemeral, indistinct forms into something intelligible and yet, it gives a flowing, lingering intention of something ungraspable; something mysterious and nostalgic.

The show will open on the 30th of September of the year 2009, Wednesday, at 6:30 pm at the Ayala Museum, Artist Space, 2nd Floor Glass Wing located at Makati Avenue corner Dela Rosa Street, Makati City. Entrance is free. The Exhibit runs until the 12th of October, 2009.

Friday, September 25, 2009

BASIC COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT SEMINAR


Basic Collections Management Seminar
October 8 & 9, Thursday and Friday, 8.30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Second of a three-part seminar series
Yuchengco Museum

P3,500 seminar fee. Discounts available for early registrants.

Learn the art and science of collections management.

Private art collectors and professionals who wish to explore the world of museums, galleries, archaeological artifacts, relics, and mementos will benefit from the Collections Management Seminar Series of the Yuchengco Museum and the Lopez Memorial Museum.

The series resumes with the intermediate module on October 8 & 9. The program aims to develop skills, apply standards, and encourage adherence to internationally accepted standards, policies, and procedures for those managing collections such as museums, galleries, and private and corporate collections.

The Intermediate Collections Management module will be held at the Yuchengco Museum from 8.30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The intermediate module will cover
(1) collections management policy (e.g. acquisitions and inter-institutional loans)
(2) the value and significance of objects in the collection
(3) insurance
(4) condition reports
(5) object care
(6) exercises on cataloguing, photo documentation and condition report preparation.

The Advanced Collection Management module, the last in the series, is scheduled in November 2009. A fee of P3,500 per person includes snacks, lunch, seminar kit and certificate. Early birds get a 10% discount (until September 23).

The seminar series will be complemented by readings and hands-on activities designed to make the concepts understandable and easy to apply, and interaction with practicing museum registrars and collection managers. Slots limited to only 25 participants. For registration and more details, contact Elma Abrina of the Yuchengco Museum at 889-1234 or e-mail abrina_programs@yuchengcomuseum.org; or contact the Lopez Museum at 631-2417.

Thursday, September 24, 2009

DUNGOG : INDIGENOUS PEOPLES FESTIVAL 2009


Dungog: Indigenous Peoples Festival 2009

This October 2009, the country celebrates the Indigenous Peoples (IP) Month at the Villareal Stadium in Roxas City, Capiz from October 2-6, 2009.

The title of this year's celebration is "DUNGOG," a Hiligaynon term, which literally means "dignity" and to other communities, "to listen." The celebration will bring representatives from Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao, in which traditional and cultural practices of 18 major communities will be highlighted.

The Welcome Ceremony will highlight three special events: (1) DUAG TUMANDOK: Solidarity Parade, which will mark the beginning of the celebration and is symbolic of the union of the IP’s in their celebration of peace and their solidarity in proclaiming the unique colors of their heritage as seen through their traditional clothing. Community Elders/Leaders shall be leading the inter-cultural and inter-regional opening ritual; (2) BUNGGAD / UMPISA will feature short performance pieces in the form of chants, songs, dances and movements descriptive of the groups’ cultural living traditions; and (3) DAYON ! (Welcoming of Guests to the IP Houses), where the Indigenous Peoples will be officially welcoming the guests to their traditional homes as part of their efforts of advocating cultural exchange and traditional arts and cultural preservation.

Click here for the (PDF format) schedule of activities.
Click here for the (word format) schedule of activities.
Or go to http://dungog.ning.com/

For more details, please contact:
DUNGOG Secretariat
Stall #1, Commercial Stalls,
Villareal Stadium, Roxas City, Capiz
Landline: +63.36.6212.935
email: dungog.secretariat@gmail.com

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

TEARS, CUTS & RUPTURES : A PHILIPPINE COLLAGE REVIEW


Roberto Chabet, Jed Escueta, Dina Gadia, Nilo Ilarde, Kaloy Olavides, Gary-Ross Pastrana, Kreskin Sugay, Gerardo Tan, Wire Tuazon, Poklong Anading & MM Yu
Tears, Cuts & Ruptures: A Philippine Collage Review
September 16 - October 17
Slab

Tears, Cuts & Ruptures: A Philippine Collage Review
By Cocoy Lumbao

Tears, Cuts & Ruptures brings to light the development of contemporary collage in the Philippines as it gathers eleven artists, Jed Escueta, Dina Gadia, Kaloy Olavides, Gary-Ross Pastrana, Kreskin Sugay, Gerardo Tan, Nilo Ilarde, Wire Tuazon, Poklong Anading and MM Yu, showing diverse works that demonstrate the many forms modern collage has gone through since Roberto Chabet’s early exhibitions during the mid-seventies. Rooted from this lineage of Formal, Conceptual, Dadaist and Pop sensibilities, the eleven artists reveal its transmutations into forms brought upon by present-day art practices, bestowing their works with images gathered from popular culture, comic books, media and photography. As a technique invariably taking the backseat from painting and the rest of the molded, collage in this exhibition undergoes close watch in an attempt to realize a modest history of its own. It seeks to unfold a growing relevance to current art practices and to secure a significant frame within it can place all its pieces to determine where it stands among the rest of contemporary art in the Philippines.

Tears, Cuts & Ruptures by opens at 6 pm in SLab September 16 and runs until the October 17, 2009. As a related gallery event, they will be having a musical evening called HAIL PRIMITIVE ROCK AND ROLL! (A Collage of the dumb, easy, noisy (anti?) music that killed King Beethoven) featuring The Sleepyheads! On September 23, 2009 from 6-9pm at SLab. Snippets of recognizable chords, riffs, shouts, thumps and guitar noises that ended the reign of serious music(Beethoven) and ushered the era of anybody-can-do-it Rock and Roll music!

Tears, Cuts & Ruptures will be shown alongside Dwelling by Frankie Callaghan at Silverlens Gallery and Archetypes by Stanley Ruiz at 20 Square.

For inquiries, contact Silverlens Gallery at 2/F YMC Bldg. II, 2320 Pasong Tamo Ext., Makati, 816-0044, 0905-2650873, or manage@silverlensphoto.com. Gallery hours are Monday to Friday 10am–7pm and Saturdays 1–6pm. www.silverlensphoto.com.

ATMOSPHERE


Eghai Roxas
“Atmosphere”
24 September – 14 October 2009

Well-known Filipino Abstract Illusionist Eghai Roxas presents his latest solo exhibition titled “Atmosphere” at the Ricco Renzo Gallery from September 24 to October 14, 2009. “Atmosphere” is the artist’s latest interpretation of his distinct style of abstraction, where abstract elements like brushstrokes and geometric shapes are rendered with a 3-dimensional effect by adding shadows beneath them, allowing them to float over the rest of the abstract composition like a surreal interpretation. In the current series of fourteen large and small-scale paintings, Eghai takes as his inspiration the artistic tradition of landscape rendered in the Asian Modernist tradition exemplified by the late National Artist for Visual Arts Jose Joya, who was Eghai’s former mentor at the University of the Philippines Diliman College of Fine Arts (UP CFA), and from whom the current generation of Filipino Abstractionists like Lito Carating, Nestor Vinluan, Alfredo Liongoren, Roy Veneracion, Benjie Cabangis, and Rock Drilon also descended from.

“Atmosphere” uses Eghai’s trademark Abstract Illusionist style to produce horizontal paintings in monochrome with faint touches of warm and earth colours to provide a cultural and aesthetic continuation from the great tradition of meditative Asian landscapes, especially the calligraphic Daoist landscapes of the Southern Sung Dynasty in China during the 12th Century, or the 17th Century Zen painters of Tokugawa Shogunate Japan. The rendering of a floating circular shape that implies a dark moon or sun above a suggestive landscape in the Atmosphere series comes close to the earlier Chinese tradition of mystical landscapes; while his thick dashes of paint floating above a flat ground in his Atmospheric Equilibrium series suggests a more Modernist source, at once celestial and mathematical in their logic and calm. On the other hand, Eghai’s Deceptive Landscape series produces a combative realm in which floating elements clash with ground and sky to produce a sudden realization that one’s life is not merely passive, but must strive to overcome struggle and adversity to reach enlightenment.

Eghai Roxas’ “Atmosphere” thus acknowledges his debt to Jose Joya’s innovative use of Modernist landscape themes in order to produce a more meditative Asian Modernist experience where order, logic, and reason combine with uncertainty, melancholy, and unpredictability. “Atmosphere” also showcases the Filipino’s ability to synthesize both eastern and western aesthetic elements simultaneously, and showing our own heroic interpretation of modern abstraction as a people fused with the lessons and answers from two cultures. Ricco Renzo Gallery is at the Ground Floor, LRI Design Plaza, 210 Nicanor Reyes Street (formerly Reposo Street), Bel Air II, Makati City. For contact details, please call or text at Mobile # 0916-469-1761.

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

SALVATION HISTORY


“Salvation History”, a group show opens at Tin-aw Art Gallery on September 11, 2009 at 6pm. The exhibit celebrates the 10th year anniversary of Cavite-based art group Anting-Anting. This is the first show of a series of three shows for the group’s first decade celebration.

“Salvation History” runs until September 30, 2009. For inquiries contact Tin-aw Art Gallery at the Upper Ground Floor, Somerset Olympia Makati, Makati Ave. cor. Sto. Tomas St., Makati City. Contact +632 8927522

ART WITHOUT BORDERS


Art Without Borders
by Stella Tansengco-Schapero

Art Without Borders marks Stella Tansengco-Schapero's first one-woman show in the country. By crossing boundaries between media, cultural themes and through the juxtaposition of found objects and images that go beyond the decorative sphere, Schapero's works reflect the artist's own multi-cultural upbringing in the Philippines and her cross-border experiences from living in the US, Europe, and Hong Kong for the past 20 plus years.

Schapero's career in the arts began when she saw the handprints of her son Jacob on an old canvas. She repainted parts to match their living room and accented the work with a golden cicada. After adding several found objects she had collected from trips accross Asia and Europe, "Golden Cicada" was completed and an unexpected commission was soon to follow.The youngest of 6 children in a closely-knit Filipino-Chinese family, Schapero was exposed to various cultures and arts and crafts at an early age by her parents who would taker her on their business trips abroad. After obtaining her bachelor's degree in A.B. Psychology from UP Diliman, she pursued her MBA at Wharton, University of Pennsylvania. A securitization banker for 18 years, Schapero left banking in 2008 to explore new business ventures while enjoying a more flexible schedule, enabling her to re-discover family, friends, and her art.

Saturday, September 19, 2009

ROSA NEGRA

Rosa Negra
a visual commentary on the state of the nation’s art

Rosa Negra (Black Rose) is a group show featuring over 35 visual artists. It was conceived as a visual commentary on the state of the nation’s art. Although initially associated with the National Artist Award, artists have found a venue to air their concerns: artistic freedom, recognition and awards, criticism and acceptance, artist education and experience, commercialization and relevance of art, integrity and responsibility. These artists seek to contribute to the reinstatement of values and improvement of ethics in contemporary Philippine visual arts. Rosa Negra is both reactive and proactive. The show opens with a program by the Concerned Artists of the Philippines (CAP) 6pm Monday 21 September 2009 at Artis Corpus Gallery, 303 Haig Street, Mandaluyong City. The show ends on 20 October 2009. The public is cordially invited.


This visual journey starts with a prophetic message from Ryan Rubio with the stern warning You may be holding a flower now, but not tomorrow, emphasizing perhaps the buddhist doctrine on impermanence and perpetual transition. Everything is temporary and everything will soon fade away. Even the most concrete of things can be ephemeral as ether. This exhibition and even these concerns will soon fade and die, as naturally as they are born.

Raphael Daniel David sets the essence behind the title of the exhibition with his Bahid (Stain). Built around the recent controversy surrounding the National Artist Award, the black rose emerged as the symbol of corruption, the death of ethics, and the seeming disrespect for the integrity of things solemn and true. Julian Araos’s Cock Tale provides elbow support for the journey to follow and Jerusalino Araos’s Pork Barrel sets the tone for this adventure in the realm of the mind and the senses.

The Chamber of the Creator

Rosa Negra presents its main character: the visual artist. Naivete, perhaps bordering on simple ignorance of the ways of the world, characterizes the visual artist who figures as a minor character in this play called Reality. Bernard Del Mundo’s Black Crown Conspiracy presents the ever present Mickey Mouse cap worn by the dunce, the idiot in any play. Dominador Laroza’s The Innocent echoes the same plight of the pawn, whose master simply commands its movements and eventually feeds it to some knight or bishop, or even a fellow pawn, or even perhaps a king or queen, of the art world. The visual artist has become a tragic victim of sorts, amplified by Zaldy Garra’s Dala ng Pangangailangan (Out of Necessity). Many principles have been put to test and many values have been sacrificed to the hungry mouth of need, want, and meaningless poverty.

Inborn talent, which needs only to be nurtured by education or experience, is coupled with innate human duality. Mark Anthony Bello is self-taught in the craft of painting. His Inborn Master implies that the artistic gene comes with the package at birth. Grandier’s Ambiguous Intentions muddles good intentions with greed for money, for fame, for power.

The Chamber of Influences

Rosa Negra then presents the multitude of characters surrounding the visual artist: the doting overly concerned parent, the master art teacher, the gallerist, the critic, the collector, and the greed that accompanies each one of them. How many times have we been warned “You cannot eat art!” Derrick Macutay’s work of the same title says what politicians whose primary battlecry is the alleviation of poverty in the streets shout about. Selfish parents in dire need of financial support in their useless years prevent artists from pursuing their aspirations. Corona Dolot continues to believe otherwise, ridiculous as it may seem, as her Hapunan (Supper) serves crimson in tubes, delivered to the hungry mouth by a round No. 14 brush.

Bondage is the eternal theme of the visual artist. Not because it is really so, but because it is chosen to be so. It is the visual artist’s friend and greatest excuse. It is the visual artist’s choice to accept a multitude of responsibilities, in the first place. It is also the habit of visual artists to listen to others, in the second place. In the artist’s mind, freedom of expression is curtailed by reactions of the people who eventually view the residue of their artistic process: the painting, the piece of sculpture. Rinne Abrugena’s Maestro (Master) in a two-part invention she calls diptych is a subtle commentary on the role of the professors in the lives of their students. Rebellion in materials, rebellion in styles, rebellion in concepts are constant fare on the studio arts floor. Jyosna Siachongco’s Bondage says it all. Flower on head plus chains around body equals apathy and non-movement. This is further echoed by Thomas Daquioag’s May Bagong Obra (There’s a New Work). Paper airplane symbolizes creativity. The traditional ball and chain in feet decelerates artistic expression instantly.

The classic role of the professional art critic was to pass judgment on a piece of art or exhibition. Credentials include a thorough education in the field of world art, preferably with a tint of anthropology and psychology. There used to be a time when artists would spend endless sleepless nights after opening an exhibition, just to read what these legitimate critics would say. In these times, however, anyone can pretend to be an art critic. This borrowed piece from Lindslee entitled Chicken War pays tribute to all of them, good or bad. As the saying goes, “Any publicity is good publicity.” Besides, most recent reviews simply show a play of words, more than real ideas, glorifying the writer more than the artist being put on the block.

The Wall of the Promoter

Here comes the greatest player of them all: the Gallerist! Rafael Louis Gonzalez’s Promises of Gold and Silver delivers the message as clearly as the words of exclusivity: “You are Mine!” The artist’s life depends primarily on creative expression, founded on the integrity of concepts flowing out of the artist’s mind and manifested using the artist’s talented hands. The artist’s career relies very heavily on the amount of expression that emanates from this creative process. Solo exhibitions give the artist full control of all the elements in play. Group exhibitions, specially thematic ones, offer a broadening of the artist’s horizon as they present challenges. The artist’s achievements are evidenced by and documented in exhibitions. Hidden works remain hidden. Something that I really cannot comprehend yet, gallerists prefer to promote exclusive artists, honing their artistic talents and creativity toward the desires of their collecting (thus, spending) audience.

As the Artists are promoted, they continue to contend with what people around them have to say. Kris Jan Gavino’s Anong Say Mo? (What do you have to say to this?) challenges the audience. Franklyn Epil’s Si Lola Basyang at Mga Bungangera (Lola Basiang and Verbal Tormentors) portrays bombardment from all sides. Calloused or not, Filipino visual artist dismisses the comments.

Artistic bondage reappears in a more brutal fashion, this time as exploitation, as these external forces surrounding the visual artist appear as aggressors. Grace Mareth Astoveza’s Over Notion grabs the artist by hand and ties it with a rope. Norlito Meimban’s Commissioned Work is the perfect illustration of the kind of puppetry that artists have to dance to when dealing with their clients and agents. Mark Anthony Bello presents an even darker side of this concern in his Patibong (Trap), perhaps an autobiographical sketch of a recent morbid experience.

The Hall of Ethics

Charlie Villagracia in his work entitled Pose introduces the driving force in the arena of contemporary visual art, possibly even in the realm of Philippine society itself: the Boar. The overly illustrated powerplayer: the King, the Queen, the Lord of Lords, is glorified by Jay Jamoralin in his Palakasan at Pakapitan (Competition in Strength and Adhesiveness). Rey Anthony Alejandro presents cunning and craft in his tiny yet powerful work Luto (Cooked), a term normally used in selecting winners in Philippine contests and competitions. Alejandro’s second work Contra Delicadeza (Insensibility) plays on the same theme of indiscretion and sheer lack of good manners and propriety. Juan Bautista’s Must be in the Center of Things properly hangs on the door of the toilet. The center of activity in any house is its outhouse. Ethics begins and ends there.

The National Artist Awards issue is presented in the next works. The selection process is likened to a play of cards common to Filipino children in Heraldo Corpus’s Tsa-Tsub: Proseso ng Pagpili (Obverse-Reverse: Selection Process). Averil Paras’s Pulitika sa Likod ng Obra (Politics behind the Work of Art) emphasizes the role of political maneuvering even in artistic endeavors. Alrashdi Mohammad’s Passengers Waiting for Nothing may very well be the resolution of these concerns. Pedro Garcia’s Cancelled Award frustrates the awardee eagerly waiting and preparing for the glorious event. Jojo Austria’s Reflection of the Place We Live in categorically presents mess as the mirror of the culture of this society we belong to. And the Filipino continues to be mute about it all in Juan Tivi’s Ang Himig ni Juan Pipi (Song of John Dumb).

The Chamber of Realities

Two more works convey a message summarizing the state of the nation’s art. JCrisanto Martinez’s Wagwagan (Flinging) contains “patches of influence altogether amalgamated in one generic artwork and artscene … called Philippine art,” as he writes. A totally unrelated piece which carries the quotation “I did not know there was a theme,” yet rebaptized to fit the show, is Ely Tablizo’s Sayonatsi (You get my slippers if you win) now called Palakasan (Powerplay).

Trends in contemporary visual arts seem to present a ready future for Filipino artists. Ray-Ann Durana simply says “Just go with the flow” in reference to the most desired style at the moment: photographic realism embellished with splotches of graphic art. Derrick Macutay shifts attention in his Reflections of Reflections as he tackles the role of multimedia in the future of visual arts. Similarly, Sam Penaso presents the same argument in his Virtual Reality utilizing digits and digitization to produce images. John Marin’s Singkit-Singkitan (Chinkplay) presents Asianification of Philippine visual arts, a trend so highly visible as markets in South East, Central Asia, and Far East have recently opened.

Juan Bautista presents the simple red dot as the fitting ending for this foreplay called Art. In his God he summarizes the motivation of all the players in the so-called commodification and commercialization of Philippine art. Artists desire it, as it satisfies their desires. Gallerists adore it, as though the prime and only test of artistry is sale, making sure that every show is “All Sold Out.” Of course, our collectors put it.

A red wall remains vacant reserved for artists who have previously agreed to join in the exhibition, verbally or otherwise. Reasons such as sicknesses and over-booking are all welcome excuses for nondelivery. To them, Juan Bautista presents his Una Rosa Negra para la Muerte de la Palabra de Honor (A Black Rose for the Death of the Word of Honor), transcending the role of the black rose in the National Artist Award.

And in the final scene when one packs everything away, Don Santana’s Mantsa (Stain) will just not go away. Period.



Enrico J. L. Manlapaz
17 September 2009


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